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Verification Partnership Coalesces

March 2016
An initiative involving more than two dozen countries has put in place its working groups and has begun its effort to bolster international capabilities for verifying future arms control agreements, officials from the United States and non-nuclear-weapon states said in interviews and email exchanges over the past few months.

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BWC Parties Prepare for Review Meeting

January/February 2016
A December meeting on controlling the spread of biological weapons left several country representatives and independent observers expressing low expectations for a major conference later this year while noting that the recent meeting had achieved some important but minimal goals.

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Syrian Chemical Arms Still Seen as Issue

January/February 2016
Participants in a meeting on chemical weapons late last year expressed ongoing and in some cases increasing concern about the information that Syria has provided on the remnants of its chemical weapons program.

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The NSG in a Time of Change: An Interview With NSG Chairman Piet de Klerk

October 2011
Piet de Klerk became the chairman of the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) in June and will hold that position until next June. In August, he became the Dutch ambassador to Jordan. Before that, he was deputy permanent representative of the Netherlands to the United Nations.

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Read all of Daniel Horner’s articles at Arms Control Today.

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COMMISSIONED ARTICLES

The IAEA LEU Bank: An Investment in a More Secure Future

August 21, 2017
On a frigid December day in 2010, Charles Curtis and Corey Hinderstein of the Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI) sat in an empty office at the headquarters of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna, intently listening to a live audio feed of a meeting of the IAEA Board of Governors elsewhere in the very same building. They were waiting for the 35-member board to take up “assurance of nuclear fuel supply,” the rubric under which it would consider a proposal that NTI had set out four years earlier: create an international “bank” of low-enriched uranium (LEU) so that countries interested in nuclear energy wouldn’t feel the need to develop their own uranium-enrichment capabilities, further spreading the technology that also can be used to build nuclear weapons.
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